5 Dempsey Writing 5-FY Assignments

Upcoming Assignments RSS Feed

Due:

Simple Sentences in Google Classroom

Simple Sentences

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Capitalization in Google Classroom

Capitalization

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Coordination Conjunctions (FANBOYS) in Google Classroom

Coordination Conjunctions (FANBOYS)

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Combining Sentences in Google Classroom

Combining Sentences

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Simple/Compound Sentences in Google Classroom

Simple/Compound Sentences

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Capitalization and Punctuation in Google Classroom

Capitalization and Punctuation

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Commas and Capitalization in Google Classroom

Commas and Capitalization

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Multiple Meaning Words in Google Classroom

Multiple Meaning Words

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Modifiers in Google Classroom

Modifiers

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Milestones Review in Google Classroom

Milestones Review

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Grammar Review in Google Classroom

Grammar Review

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Grammar Review in Google Classroom

Grammar Review

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Grammar Review in Google Classroom

Grammar Review

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Quizizz - Milestones Practice #2 in Google Classroom

Quizizz - Milestones Practice #2

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Quizizz - Milestones Review #1 in Google Classroom

Quizizz - Milestones Review #1

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Quizizz - Milestones Review #3 in Google Classroom

Quizizz - Milestones Review #3

Past Assignments

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Quiz -

Quiz - "Wait Till Helen Comes"

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Vocabulary Quiz in Google Classroom

Vocabulary Quiz

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Choice Topic Argumentative Essay in Google Classroom

Choice Topic Argumentative Essay

Below are all of the documents you need to complete the choice topic argument essay.
Each topic has 2 articles.

First, decide which topic you are going to write on: Athletic Shoes for Running or Recycling.
Then, decide your claim and counterclaim for the topic.
Next, take notes from the articles - fnd evidence that supports the claim, and evidence that supports the counterclaim.
After your evidence has been found for both sides of the argument, fill in the graphic organizers for each paragraph of the essay.
Finally, type your paragraphs/essay on the attached document.
The RUBRIC for this essay is also attached to this assignment.

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Achieve 3000

Achieve 3000 "With All Due Respect"

Please go to Achieve 3000.  Read and complete the article titled, "With All Due Respect."

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"R" Vocabulary Quiz

Please complete the vocabulary quiz below.

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Modifiers 2 in Google Classroom

Modifiers 2

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Modifiers 1 in Google Classroom

Modifiers 1

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Vocabulary

Vocabulary "R" Words **For Absent Students**

If you are absent from school, complete the packet on a separate sheet of paper.
If you have a printer, you can print this and complete it.

Due:

Friday February 4, 2022 IF YOU ARE ABSENT in Google Classroom

Friday February 4, 2022 IF YOU ARE ABSENT

Learning Target: 

Today, I am learning to find the right evidence and write a justification of the evidence that supports both the premise and claim.
Success Criteria: To be successful, I can:
define evidence;
identify effective evidence and explain why; 
write a justification for a provided claim, premise, and evidence;
take written notes regarding the article 
complete the graphic organizer for claim, premise, counterclaim;
begin writing an introduction to the argumentative essay;
continue writing my paper by working on the first body paragraph. 
Connection: Yesterday we discussed the need to “set the scene”--to provide a lead-in for your evidence. 
Today we are going to work on two different aspects of the body paragraph–selecting evidence and writing a justification of the evidence.


Review: Claim: Junior high and high schools should start later. ---Marque su párrafo basado en la presentación.
Junior high and high schools should start an hour later because students need the extra rest to concentrate in school. Experts agree that this rest is vital for optimal brain function. Dr. Snooze at the ZZZ Center for Sleep explains, “Exhaustion is a huge obstacle in the path toward academic success.” When students are tired, they simply can’t focus in class. A simple solution to this problem is starting school later, thus giving students an extra hour to sleep in the morning.   
(bold= premise (supporting reason; underlined portion= setting the scene/lead-in to the evidence; italics= evidence)
Mini-Lesson:
Over the last couple of days we have discussed several different claims.
Consider the following claim:
College athletes should be paid.
What other reasons (premises) could we use to prove this point?
What evidence would help us show the validity of our reason?


Student Directions: Using Evidence
Read each claim and premise below. Then, choose one piece of provided evidence to best support the premise. Next to each option, explain why you would or would not include it as evidence in a paragraph for an argumentative essay. (Complete the handout "Finding the Right Evidence")


Justification
Junior high and high schools should start an hour later because students need the extra rest to concentrate in school. Experts agree that this rest is vital for optimal brain function. Dr. Snooze at the ZZZ Center for Sleep explains, “Exhaustion is a huge obstacle in the path toward academic success.” When students are tired, they simply can’t focus in class. A simple solution to this problem is starting school later, thus giving students an extra hour to sleep in the morning. (underline=evidence; bold= justification of the premise; italics= justification of the claim as presented in the introduction)
Student Directions: Read each claim and premise below. Then, choose one piece of provided evidence to best support the premise. Next to each option, explain why you would or would not include it as evidence in a paragraph for an argumentative essay. (Complete the handout "Justification")


Independent Work: (Different classes are working at different points in regards to the writing process.
Finish taking notes on whether or not cursive writing should be taught in schools.
Complete the half sheet on which you will identify your claim, two supporting premises, and your counterclaim.
Write your introduction—Hook, Summary, Claim.
If you have finished your introduction, begin working on the paragraph proving your claim. 
Remember to use your own words. 


In writing the body paragraphs–If you are using the words from the article, you need to put them in quotation marks. If you are using the ideas from the article, you need to reference the paragraph.

Due:

Thursday February 3, 2022 IF YOU ARE ABSENT in Google Classroom

Thursday February 3, 2022 IF YOU ARE ABSENT

Today we are learning how to introduce your evidence in your body paragraph.
Introducing the evidence is 1 sentence that gives some background information for the evidence you are including in your paragraph.
You can use one of the sentence starters from the box on the worksheet to begin your intro to evidence sentence.
Follow the directions and complete the worksheet below.

Due:

Wednesday February 2, 2022 IF YOU ARE ABSENT in Google Classroom

Wednesday February 2, 2022 IF YOU ARE ABSENT

Today we are learning about Premises.
A premise is a reason to support your claim. 
It is he first sentence in an argumentative body paragraph.
On the worksheet, match each premise to the claim it supports.

Due:

Tuesday - Thursday Jan. 25-27 in Google Classroom

Tuesday - Thursday Jan. 25-27

**THIS IS ONLY FOR STUDENTS WHO HAVE MISSED SCHOOL**

Complete the activities below for Argument writing if you have been absent from school.
On the Hook activity, you will create different types of hooks based the topic you choose.
On the Summary activity, you will write a hook that leads into the summary provided. 
Then you will match the given hooks on the left to the bulleted topics on the right. 
Choose 3 of the summary bullet points. 
Write the hook that goes with the topic/bullet points, then write a summary of the bullet points.

Due:

Monday January 24, 2022 in Google Classroom

Monday January 24, 2022

****Complete in Google Classroom only if you are not at school****Read the mystery, "The Bountiful Case."
Complete the Case Report.
Make a claim, premise (reason), give evidence from the mystery, and a justification for your premise.
Make a counterclaim (the opposite of your claim) with a premise (reason), give evidence for your counterclaim from the story, and justify your reason for the counterclaim.
Then, explain what you think in the best piece of evidence that most strongly support what happened to Mr. Walter Bountiful.

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Vocabulary quiz and Achieve 3000 in Google Classroom

Vocabulary quiz and Achieve 3000

Today we are taking a quiz on the Argumentative Writing Vocabulary.  The quiz can be found below.
You may use your notes on the quiz.
After the quiz, please read the Achieve 3000 article titled, "The Case of Having Pets."
Answer the questions and complete the thought question.  The worksheet for Achieve is below.

Due:

Achieve 3000 in Google Classroom

Achieve 3000

Please login to Achieve 3000.
Choose my class.
Ready and answer the questions for the article titled, "Despicable Disposables." 
It has been assigned to you.
When finished with the questions, please record your scores on the attached document.  
Also, please write your response to the Thought Question on the same document.

Due:

**If you were Absent or have Missing Work in Google Classroom

**If you were Absent or have Missing Work

Have you been Absent?
Are you Missing Work?

If you are at home and need to complete any of these tasks via the computer, please see the various attached documents. 
Complete only the assignments that you are missing. 
You do not need to duplicate any work that you have already done.



[email protected]


Jan. 7th
Achieve—“Think Before You Post”
Complete the “Response” questions for the Achieve article. Then
answer the thought question (below).
The Article ends by advising, "Think Before You Post."  
Do you think this is good advice? Why or why not? 
Use facts and details from the Article, as well as your own ideas, to support your response.

Jan. 10- IXL (does not need to be made-up)

Jan. 11-13th
Pre-test Essay for the Argumentative Unit
Student Directions:
Over the next two days (we used three days), you will write
an argumentative essay in which you establish and prove your opinion/claim on
whether tap water or bottled water is better.

You will use evidence from the two articles to support and prove your
opinion (see attachments).  When you write your essay, draw on everything
you know about writing essays, persuasive essays/letters, and reviews. 

In your writing, make sure you: 

• Write an introduction. 

• State your opinion or claim. 

• Give reasons and evidence. 

• Organize your writing. 

• Acknowledge counterclaims. 

• Use transition words. 

• Write a conclusion.
Please see the attached resources that you will need for your paper.

Jan. 14th
Achieve— “Despicable Disposables”
Complete the “Response” questions for the Achieve article. Then answer the thought question (below).
Think about the use of disposable take-out containers. 
How are plastic containers different from paper containers? 
How are they the same? 
Use facts and details from the Article in your response.

Due:

Wed/Thurs Jan. 19/20, 2022 -

Wed/Thurs Jan. 19/20, 2022 - "Arson on Arlington Drive?" - Claim, Premise, Evidence Practice

Read the attached detective report about fires that happened on Arlington Drive.  
You will look at the evidence and determine your claim: 
Were the fires 
started by a neighborhood arsonist, or 
were the fires just a string of unfortunate coincidences?
Fill in the boxes on the attached worksheet  with your claim, premise, evidence, justification, counterclaim, evidence and justification.

Due:

Make-up: Subject Verb Agreement in Google Classroom

Make-up: Subject Verb Agreement

This is a new link in case you didn't finish it last week.

If you did this last week, you do not need to do this one unless you want a better grade.

Due:

Make-Up: Multiple Meaning Words in Google Classroom

Make-Up: Multiple Meaning Words

This is a new link in case you didn't finish it last week.

If you did this last week, you do not need to do this one unless you want a better grade.

Due:

Paragraph Writing in Google Classroom

Paragraph Writing

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Pre-Test - Argument - Wednesday, January 12, 2022 in Google Classroom

Pre-Test - Argument - Wednesday, January 12, 2022

Learning Target/ Teaching Point: 
Today, I will produce an argument essay, so that feedback can be given to further improve my writing.
Success Criteria:
To be successful, I can…
write for an extended period of time.
write my opinion on a provided topic.
use evidence from the provided articles to support my opinion
Connection:
Our next unit is Argument writing.

Today, you will complete your pre-test for our Argument Unit. Your evidence will be drawn from the two provided articles, as well as your own knowledge concerning the subject. 

Introduction/ mini-lesson:
This initial assessment will help us track your progress over the course of this unit and the year, and it will serve as a valuable source of information to inform us both of your progress.

Student Directions 
Today, you will  finish writing your argumentative essay in which you establish and prove your opinion/claim on whether tap water or bottled water is better.
You will use evidence from the two articles to support and prove your opinion (see attachments).  When you write your essay, draw on everything you know about writing essays, persuasive essays/letters, and reviews. 


In your writing, make sure you: 
• Write an introduction. 
• State your opinion or claim. 
• Give reasons and evidence. 
• Organize your writing. 
• Acknowledge counterclaims. 
• Use transition words. 
• Write a conclusion.
Please see the attached resources that you will need for your paper.


If you are out of school today, open a the Google Document below and type your response. Remember to share you work with me--

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Multiple Meaning Words in Google Classroom

Multiple Meaning Words

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Subject Verb Agreement in Google Classroom

Subject Verb Agreement

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Achieve 3000 in Google Classroom

Achieve 3000

Please complete the article "Think Before You Post" on Achieve.
Then complete the worksheet below by answering the thought question.

Due:

Choice Topic Informational Paper in Google Classroom

Choice Topic Informational Paper

Learning Target/ Teaching Point: Today I will learn that information writers examine and use reliable Internet sources to research their topics. 

Success Criteria:
To Be Successful, I can. . .
Select a research topic
Use the Internet to find reliable source material
Take notes on my topic


Do Now:
Students will use the details of the picture to explain the image’s purpose/message.

Share your response.

Video about believing what you find on the internet:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3DZbSlkFoSU


Connection:
Now that we have completed your first Informational Essay (on Vultures), it is time for  you to select your own topic. In selecting your topic, you need to remember the purpose of your essay: to inform, teach, and explain. Keep in mind that Informational Essays are also called Explanatory Essays.


Mini Lesson
The teacher will review the Anchor Chart--”Qualities of Good Informational Writing”--with the students. 
Qualities of Good Informational Writing
The purpose is to inform, teach, and explain
Sections are focused on one subtopic
Has details and facts
Includes examples such as stories, quotes, and statistics
Uses headings
Uses “expert language” - words and phrases important to the topic
With definitions for many of these words
Besides words, should include images, captions, tables, or charts
After reviewing the Anchor Chart, the teacher will review what to look for in evaluating Internet Sources:
(No to Wikipedia and Personal Blogs)
What is the URL? (.org, .edu, .com, .net, .gov)
Organization
Educational
Commercial
Network
Government
Does the website list an author or editor?Is the information current?Is the information reliable?What is the purpose of the website? (Educate, Inform, Teach, Entertain, Sell something?)Can you find similar information on another website?Begin researching for an idea for a topic to write on.
Once you have a topic, you can begin taking notes.
Please write down the sources where you find the information.

Due:

10/27/21 Vulture Paper in Google Classroom

10/27/21 Vulture Paper

Today we will be starting to write the paper on vultures.
Attached is a document to type the paper on.
Also attached is the presentation for today's lesson.
We are introducing the P.E.E.L. strategy for informational writing.
You can find the handout with the explanation of P.E.E.L. attached below.

Due:

10/29/21 Continue Vulture paper/Participial Phrase (-ing phrase) Quiz Re-Do in Google Classroom

10/29/21 Continue Vulture paper/Participial Phrase (-ing phrase) Quiz Re-Do

Learning Target/ Teaching Point: Today I will learn that information writers review the research they have accumulated and organize it into paragraphs.

Success Criteria:
To Be Successful, I can. . .

Use the checklist for writing paragraphs;
Refer to the grading rubric;
Organize my notes;
Focus on a single subtopic;
Use transitional words and phrases; 
Write the next paragraph/section of my essay. 



Do Now: Complete the quiz re-do sheet. This is a participation grade and will be averaged in with the Participial quiz grade.
 
Connection:
Yesterday we reviewed how to incorporate transitional words and phrases. Writers use transitions so that ideas and details are presented in a logical order and that the writing is coherent. 

Link:
Let’s review our checklist.
Paragraph Checklist
Heading
Topic Sentence (what the paragraph is about)
Detail(s) from your research
Fact(s) from your notes 
Where you found the fact
Explanation of the fact
Use transitional words and phrases (NEW)
Transition to the next sentence or paragraph


Mini Lesson
Students will be writing their essays today. If a student needs to review a particular element of the writing process, the presentations for the week are posted on Google Classroom.
Students should refer to the Paragraph Checklist and the transitional word handout. 
Students should utilize their notes to make sure that they are including accurate details and evidence in their paragraphs. 

Active Engagement/Share: 
Partners/Small Groups--
•As needed, conference with your partner when you have a question regarding the flow of your essay or when you need assistance finding supporting evidence. 


Independent: 
Today, the students will use the Chromebooks to work on the next paragraph/section of the body paragraphs for their essay.

Due:

10/15/21 Participial Phrases Day 3 in Google Classroom

10/15/21 Participial Phrases Day 3

Journal Entry
Describe what you did before you got to school this morning.



Brent ambles across Justin’s lawn in a muscle T, annihilating patches of innocent grass with his gigantic flip-flops.Let’s look at the focus sentence. What are we looking for in the sentence?Chart: Sentence/ What Changed? What is the effect of the change?
Brent ambles across Justin’s lawn in a muscle T, annihilate patches of innocent grass with his gigantic flip flops.
Annihilating patches of innocent grass with his gigantic flip-flops, Brent ambles across Justin’s lawn in a muscle T.
Brent ambles across Justin’s lawn in a muscle T, annihilating patches. 

      3)   Student Practice (Partner or Individual?)Complete the same chart but use a sentence from Day 2 (chart provided below).
You can work on IXL - finish the Diagnostic if you haven't.  Work on Skills G1, J1, K2, K4, or recommended skills.

Due:

10/5/2021 Sentence Structure Quiz in Google Classroom

10/5/2021 Sentence Structure Quiz

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10/4/21 Practice - Sentence Structure  in Google Classroom

10/4/21 Practice - Sentence Structure

Today we will be looking closely at the fourth type of sentence structure: compound complex.
https://youtu.be/Hnmm57B0JgQ
Compound Complex Sentences
To understand a compound complex sentence, let's review compound sentences and complex sentences.
A compound sentence is made of two independent clauses  joined by a coordinating conjunction (FANBOYS).
A complex sentence is made of an independent clause  and a dependent clause.
So, a compound complex sentence is made up of more than one sentence joined by a conjunction, and at least one of those sentences is complex. In other words, it is a compound sentence with a dependent clause.
Examples of Compound Complex Sentences:
In these examples, the dependent, or subordinate, clause is underlined.
1. When I grow up, I want to be a ballerina, so my mom will be proud of me.
2. I will get to watch television, but first, I have to clean up the dishes after we finish eating.
3. We won the game, but my uniform was muddy because it rained the entire time.
4. After our trip to the beach, school started back, and I was excited to see my friends.
5. Sarah cried when her cat got sick, but he soon got better.6. The sun is shining through the clouds, so I think that we can go swimming.



Students will complete two IXL exercises: 
Z.4 Is the sentence simple compound, complex, or compound complex?
MM.2 Commas with compound and complex sentences

Due:

Review Quiz in Google Classroom

Review Quiz

Please answer the following questions.

Due:

Your Story - Realistic Fiction in Google Classroom

Your Story - Realistic Fiction

This is where you can type out your story as you work on it at home.  It will be saved to your drive. You can message me to read what you have so far, and I will comment on your story. We can also discuss your paper when we meet online during the school day.
Please do not submit it. The final story will not be due until we return from Distance Learning.
Email me with any questions as you continue to write at home.
[email protected]

Due:

9/1/21 - From 2D to 3D in Google Classroom

9/1/21 - From 2D to 3D

https://drive.google.com/file/d/15nDAPdb1gmVh_73bRhdQPEinJxvely_p/view?usp=sharing

9/1/21

Learning Target: I am learning that fictional writers make their stories come to life by providing evidence in the story’s events, showing not telling, and story-tell, bit by bit.
Success Criteria:  I can:
Differentiate between a summary and a story
Include evidence in your story
Show characters in action
Add tension by developing action


Writers need to make their story ideas come to life.

The idea for your story is like a summary.  
It TELLS what the story is about.
We call that a 2D story idea.   

The story itself needs to come to life!! It needs evidence of the events that happen! It needs to SHOW details, emotion, and needs to come to life.
We can call this a 3D story.

Let’s look at the difference:

Example of a 2D story idea:
On Friday afternoon, Mr. Smith’s snake escaped the science lab.

Example of a 3D story:
The breeze rattled the shades as it blew into our classroom window.  There was soft music playing in the background.  The classroom was still except for the occasional turning of a page.  Everyone was engrossed in reading.  Suddenly, the door to the classroom swung open with a slam.  Mr. Smith stood in the doorway. His glasses slightly crooked, his forehead beaded with sweat, “The snake escaped!”

Can you see the difference? 
The 2D version is a summary.  It TELLS a lot of information quickly, in not that many words.
The 3D version is storytelling!  It SHOWS what is happening bit by bit in a scene.

Now it’s your turn to try this.
On the attached document, write a 2D summary of one scene of your story.
Then, write a 3D version of that same scene - make the scene come to life with details, emotion, and step-by-step action.

When finished, continue to work on your story

Due:

8/30/21  Internal/External Conflict - Motivations and Struggles in Google Classroom

8/30/21 Internal/External Conflict - Motivations and Struggles

https://drive.google.com/file/d/1cFEGr7qcBEVL0C9eJqOwcHVRttfXj8Ih/view?usp=sharing


8/30/21


Learning Target: I am learning that writers develop characters who face internal and/or external struggles, so that I can create conflicts for my characters.

Success Criteria:  I can
Define internal and external conflict
Complete a T-Chart for my character that includes internal and/or external conflicts
Determine what my character wants in my story
Determine what stands in the way of my character being successful


Let’s look closely at 2 of the characters from The Outsiders:  Ponyboy and Johnny.
What do they want in the story? What motivates them? (character motivations)
What do they struggle with? 
Ponyboy: 
Motivation - he wants to win the affection and love of his brother, Darry.
Struggle: He feels he is a constant let down to his brother.
Johnny:
Motivation - his guilt for killing Bob.
Struggle: he feels he should die or suffer consequences for that.

When writing a story, you need to develop your character as if he/she is a real person with desires (things they want) and struggles (obstacles that get in their way)

Think about the story you are writing and the main character you are creating.
What is your story about?
Who is your main character?
What does your character want (or not want) 
        This is your character’s motivation.
Is anything preventing your character from getting what he wants or doesn’t want?
      This is your character’s obstacle or struggle

Characters can also have internal and external conflicts.
External - Some object or recognition the character wants (skateboard trophy)
Internal - Something that the character feels inside of himself (pleasing his dad; no confidence in himself))

Types of Conflict
External
generally takes place between a person and someone or something else, such as nature, another person or persons, or an event or situation. External conflicts may be character vs. character, character vs. nature, or character vs. society.


Internal
Takes place in a person’s mind—for example, a struggle to make a decision or overcome a feeling. Internal conflicts are character vs. self.



Individual Work:
You will complete the T-Chart for your main character to show what his/her internal and/or external conflicts he/she has.

You will also complete the Internal/External conflict worksheet.

Then, you will work on your own scene, jumping right into the action of the scene. Add details of the setting and try to show how the character feels and the conflicts he/she has.

Due:

8/26/21  Show, Don't Tell in Google Classroom

8/26/21 Show, Don't Tell

Today I will learn that writers develop characters by showing and not telling, so that I will be able to create realistic characters.


Please review and follow the presentation. You will complete the "Show Don't Tell" handout as today's assignment.


Remember what we discussed yesterday about scenes (this Anchor Chart should be copied into your Writer's Notebook):
                     Scenes
=Are small moments or mini-stories
=Include a clear setting that is woven throughout the moment
=Have characters who are thinking, talking, acting, or perhaps doing all of those things
=Contain a character motivation and obstacle of some sort


Remember what we discussed about developing character
•Show the setting
•Describe what the character is thinking at that moment
•Have someone say something
•Show characters actions
•Have the character make a decision
•Generate Traits
•Reveal wants and challenges
•Consider character’s attitudes toward self.
•Explore character’s relationships with others.
•Describe character’s movements, facial expressions, tics, styles, quirks, etc.






Showing vs. Telling

TELLING: 
Mikell was terribly afraid of the dark.


SHOWING: 
As his mother switched off the light and left the room, Mikell tensed. He huddled under the covers, gripped the sheets, and held his breath as the wind brushed past the curtain.


(Charlotte’s Web text) Turn and Talk: How does the passage show rather than tell?

Here are 4 “Show, Don’t Tell” Tips (copy the 4 tips in notebooks)
Tip #1. Create a sense of setting
Tip #2. Use dialogue to show character
Tip #3. If in doubt, always describe action
Tip #4. Use strong details, but don’t overdo it
Example:
Enzo was late.  >>>>>>>>>> 
He was late. St Mark’s clocktower had struck one and Enzo found himself pushing against the tide of tourists wandering towards the cafes lining the Piazza San Marco. A clump of pigeons scattered in front of him. He muttered to himself, “I won’t make it in time.”    



Now, it is your turn. 
Complete the Show, don’t Tell worksheet.
Then, continue to work on developing the setting and characters of your story.