Henderson Writing 7th-FY Assignments

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Past Assignments

Due:

4.26 Milestone Review in Google Classroom

4.26 Milestone Review

Learning Target: 

I can identify the claim of an argumentative text.  
Success Criteria: To Be Successful, I can--
Define an argumentative claim
Evaluate passages to determine the claim.
Continue working on the assigned IXL Milestone exercises
Independent Work: 

Students will complete a Google Form review of argumentative claims. 
Students will then continue working on their IXL assignments. (please see the starred activities in IXL)

Due:

4.20 Millstone Review- Extended Response in Google Classroom

4.20 Millstone Review- Extended Response

Learning Target: 

I can compare/contrast two informational passages and write a response to an extended response prompt so as to prepare for the Milestone Test

Success Criteria:  I can. . .
Review and analyze the Informational Writer’s Checklist
Analyze the prompt
Write a response to the extended response
Use textual evidence to support my main idea
Continue working on the assigned IXL Milestone exercises
Finish your Constructed Response if necessary
Connection: Today, we will review the expectation of the extended response. We will continue to use the two articles that we have been working with this week. The extended response is worth 7 points.

Mini-Lesson: 
Review the point break down of the test (2021 according to the released material)
Review and analyze the Writer's Checklist for the Informational/Explanatory Extended Response

Independent Work:
Complete the Extended Response (use the attached document)

If time allows:
Finish your constructed response (from 4/19)
Work on the IXL Milestone Review Exercises

Due:

April 12, 2022 Milestone Review (complete the assignment only if you are absent) in Google Classroom

April 12, 2022 Milestone Review (complete the assignment only if you are absent)

Complete the assignment only if you are absent.



Learning Target: I can evaluate a poem and write a narrative response to a provided prompt in order to prepare  for the Milestones Test.


Success Criteria: I can. . .
Evaluate the 4-point grading scale for the Narrative Response
Read and analyze the poem “Being Connected”
Evaluate the Narrative Writer’s Checklist
Analyze the writing prompt
Create a narrative response to the prompt
Connection: At the beginning of the year, you wrote both a personal narrative and a realistic fiction essay. Today, we will look at one way that the Milestones test incorporates narrative writing.


Mini-Lesson: please see the presentation for the break down of the 4 point Narrative Rubric.


Turn and Talk (Self-check if absent):
Exchange papers
Read your partner’s story
Check your partner’s work against the provided 4 point scale rubric. 
Talk about your stories
Summary of the Day: What are some of the details you included in your narrative response?

If you finish today’s assignment early, please continue to work on the Milestone IXL Skills exercises. 


Attached: Today's presentation, the poem for the writing assignment, the Narrative Writing Checklist (back of poem),

Due:

Argumentative Essay #2 in Google Classroom

Argumentative Essay #2

Please follow the format of the graphic organizers to complete your essay. Essays are due Friday, March 4th.

Due:

Feb. 10 Argumentative Conclusions in Google Classroom

Feb. 10 Argumentative Conclusions

Learning Target: I am learning to write a conclusion for an argumentative essay.
Success Criteria: To be Successful, I can. . .
Use a transition
restate my claim
summarize my evidence
create a mic drop sentence
continue writing my argumentative essay.
Do Now: (complete the following sentences with the correct vocabulary term)
discourse    discretion   disreputable   demure  dishevel 
Knowing that she was in trouble, the girl changed her facial expression so that she faced her mother with a ____________ smile. 
Liars are often seen as being ________________.
A parent-teacher conference is a way that each part can participate in a civil ____________.
Having stayed up all night finishing a science project, the boy came to school looking ____________.
The coach used his ____________ to let the quarterback play. 
VOCABULARY QUIZ TOMORROW, FRIDAY (2/11)


Mini-Lesson
Conclusions–Copy these notes into your Notebook

Restate the claim - you can use a thesaurus to help with this
Acknowledge the counterclaim
Summary of evidence: **no new info**
**refer to your premises**
**one sentence for each body paragraph**

MIC DROP sentence –This will be discussed in the next lesson
Complete the Worksheet: "Restating Your Claim"
Student Directions: This activity focuses on the first part of a conclusion paragraph – restating the claim. In this activity, you will be working with several claims that you must reword as if you were writing the first part of a conclusion paragraph.
Remember, you are rewording these sentences, so you cannot simply state the same exact thing! It will also be helpful to include a transition word or phrase at the beginning of your new sentence to let readers know they have arrived at the conclusion.



Student Directions: Read through the sample argumentative essay below. You have been given an introduction and two body paragraphs, but the conclusion is missing. Your task is to practice writing the conclusion by 1) restating the claim in new words, and 2) summarizing the evidence. The first sentence of your summary should acknowledge the counterclaim’s evidence. The second sentence should restate evidence that supports the claim’s position.

But, before you do all of this, label all the elements of an argumentative essay that you have been taught. This will help you easily identify the claim that needs to be restated and the evidence that needs to be summarized. 
The summary should acknowledge the counterclaim’s evidence, while the second sentence should restate evidence that supports the claim’s position.
Read the paper that is provided on "Summarizing the Evidence Activity" and refer to the sample conclusion> below:

On the whole, schools should permit the productive use of cell phones in class. Yet, some people dismiss this idea, believing that cell phones will only disrupt learning. What they fail to consider, however, is that many phone applications actually aid student learning. If schools care about learning and productivity then they should allow cell phones in class.


The presentation explains the conclusion more.
Independent Work:
Finish your introduction
Write your 1st body paragraph, which focuses on your premise that supports your claim
If you are ready, begin working on  your counterclaim paragraph

Due:

Feb. 9- Counterclaims  in Google Classroom

Feb. 9- Counterclaims

Learning Target: Today, I am learning how to write a counterclaim. 
Success Criteria: To Be Successful, I can. . .
identify a counterclaim
write counterclaims for provided claims
identify the parts of a counterclaim paragraph
utilize the T.O.V.R. method to introduce the counterclaim
Do Now: Read the sentences carefully and then complete the sentence with the correct vocabulary word. (Vocabulary quiz on Friday)

disband   distort    disposition   distinction   disperse 



In general, the child had a sour __________ for it was in her nature to be disagreeable.
The committee for building the new school ___________ after the project was complete.
When the administrators and teachers arrived at the fight, the students ____________ in all directions.
There are numerous cell phone apps that allow you to ______________ your selfies.
Primarily due to their grades some students receive, the _____________of being invited to join the Middle School Beta Club.
Mini-Lesson

Counterclaim:
Final body paragraph of the essay
shows that there is another side to the argument
then shows how your side is stronger
TOVR--How to craft your counterclaim.

Possible Transitions to Use:
         However, But, Admittedly, Although, Alternatively, On the other hand, At the same time,
Words to Identify the Opposition:
         others, some, a few, many, certain groups
Strong Verbs:
          reject, oppose, disagree, believe, question, argue that, reason that, claim that, support, conclude that
Don’t forget your reason!
Read the following paragraph and identify the use of TOVR:
There are some, however, who believe that cell phones hinder learning by distracting students. According to experts from Pew Research Center, “One in three teens sends more than 100 text messages a day” (Lenhart et al.). Because statistics like this, some conclude that no good can come from using phones in class. However, when students utilize them as a tool (for instance, as a calculator or dictionary), rather than as a texting or social media device, cell phones can be a great help in school; therefore, they should be allowed in the classroom.  

(See the presentation for a sample counterclaim paragraph with each part of TOVR marked).


Active Engagement:
Complete the Student Claims and Counterclaims (the side with the two columns--claim, counterclaim).
The first two have been completed for you as examples (see the presentation).


Independent Work:
Finish your introduction
Write your 1st body paragraph, which focuses on your premise that supports your claim
Rewrite your counterclaim using TOVR
If you are ready, begin working on  your counterclaim paragraph
Graphic Organizers for each of the first three paragraphs--introduction, body paragraph #1 for the claim, body paragraph #2 for the counterclaim--are included in "Body Paragraph Graphic Organize" worksheet.

Due:

Feb. 8 Lesson 13- Justification, Claims, and Counterclaims in Google Classroom

Feb. 8 Lesson 13- Justification, Claims, and Counterclaims

Learning Target: Today, I am learning to write a justification of supporting evidence. I am learning how to write a counterclaim. 
Success Criteria: To Be Successful, I can. . .
write a justification that connects my evidence back to the premise and the claim of my paper.
identify a counterclaim
write counterclaims for provided claims
identify the parts of a counterclaim paragraph
utilize the T.O.V.R. method to introduce the counterclaim
Do Now: Read the sentences carefully and then complete the sentence with the correct vocabulary word. (Vocabulary quiz on Friday)
defiance  disregard  demerit  discord  debris  dispensary 
Thanksgiving is a time my family argues with each other; this _________ always leads to someone crying. 
At the Citadel, the military college of South Carolina, cadets receive __________ for not properly making their beds.
Please ___________ the text you received. It was meant to go to someone else. 
The living room was full of ___________ after the kid’s birthday party; empty cups, half-eaten cupcakes, and plates seemed to be everywhere.
In some cultures, young people would never show _____________ to their elders. 
The sick student had to go to the _______________ to get a Covid test.  


Mini-Lesson


Copy the following into your Writer's Notebook:

Justification is the last element in argumentative body paragraphs.
(It can also be called analysis, explanation, evaluation)
THIS IS THE HEART OF THE ESSAY!!!
This is where you explain WHY this evidence was chosen 
There are 2 PARTS (2 sentences):
1 - explain how the evidence connects to the premise
2 - explain how the evidence and premise connect to the claim


Use the attached document to write a justification sentence (for the premise and the claim) for the provided paragraph.


TOVR--How to craft your counterclaim.
 

Possible Transitions to Use:
However, But, Admittedly, Although, Alternatively, On the other hand, At the same time,

Words to Identify the Opposition:
others, some, a few, many, certain groups

Strong Verbs:
reject, oppose, disagree, believe, question, argue that, reason that, claim that, support, conclude that

Don’t forget your reason!


Read the following paragraph and identify the use of TOVR:
There are some, however, who believe that cell phones hinder learning by distracting students. According to experts from Pew Research Center, “One in three teens sends more than 100 text messages a day” (Lenhart et al.). Because statistics like this, some conclude that no good can come from using phones in class. However, when students utilize them as a tool (for instance, as a calculator or dictionary), rather than as a texting or social media device, cell phones can be a great help in school; therefore, they should be allowed in the classroom. 


Active Engagement:
Complete the Student Claims and Counterclaims (the side with the two columns--claim, counterclaim).
The first two have been completed for you as examples (see the presentation).


Independent Work:
Finish your introduction
Write your 1st body paragraph, which focuses on your premise that supports your claim
If you are ready, begin working on  your counterclaim paragraph
Graphic Organizers for each of the first three paragraphs--introduction, body paragraph #1 for the claim, body paragraph #2 for the counterclaim--are included in "Student Body Paragraph Practice."

Due:

Feb. 7, 2022--Using Evidence in Google Classroom

Feb. 7, 2022--Using Evidence

Learning Target: Today, I am learning to find the right evidence to support a premise and claim. Success Criteria:  I can…
explain “right” evidence 
explain why you would or would not include evidence in a paragraph
Continue reading the article and recording evidence you can use to support your claim and premise(s)
Write your Introductory paragraph
Introduction/Connection:
Last week we discussed selecting the best evidence to support your premise. We will quickly review that same skill today. You will then have time to work on researching and writing your essay.
Mini-Lesson
Review the parts of an argumentative introduction (see presentation)


Active Engagement: 
Student Directions: Read each claim and premise below. Then, choose one piece of provided evidence to best support the premise. Next to each option, explain why you would or would not include it as evidence in a paragraph for an argumentative essay. (This is the same style of assignment that we completed on Friday).
See the attached worksheet


Independent Work: 
When finished with the worksheet, students will work on their argumentative essay.

Due:

Feb. 4, Argument: Evidence and Justification (Lesson 11) in Google Classroom

Feb. 4, Argument: Evidence and Justification (Lesson 11)

Learning Target: 

Today, I am learning to find the right evidence and write a justification of the evidence that supports both the premise and claim.
Success Criteria: To be successful, I can:
define evidence;
identify effective evidence and explain why; 
write a justification for a provided claim, premise, and evidence;
take written notes regarding the article 
complete the graphic organizer for claim, premise, counterclaim;
begin writing an introduction to the argumentative essay;
continue writing my paper by working on the first body paragraph. 
Connection: Yesterday we discussed the need to “set the scene”--to provide a lead-in for your evidence. 
Today we are going to work on two different aspects of the body paragraph–selecting evidence and writing a justification of the evidence.


Review: Claim: Junior high and high schools should start later. ---Marque su párrafo basado en la presentación.
Junior high and high schools should start an hour later because students need the extra rest to concentrate in school. Experts agree that this rest is vital for optimal brain function. Dr. Snooze at the ZZZ Center for Sleep explains, “Exhaustion is a huge obstacle in the path toward academic success.” When students are tired, they simply can’t focus in class. A simple solution to this problem is starting school later, thus giving students an extra hour to sleep in the morning.   
(bold= premise (supporting reason; underlined portion= setting the scene/lead-in to the evidence; italics= evidence)
Mini-Lesson:
Over the last couple of days we have discussed several different claims.
Consider the following claim:
College athletes should be paid.
What other reasons (premises) could we use to prove this point?
What evidence would help us show the validity of our reason?


Student Directions: Using Evidence
Read each claim and premise below. Then, choose one piece of provided evidence to best support the premise. Next to each option, explain why you would or would not include it as evidence in a paragraph for an argumentative essay. (Complete the handout "Finding the Right Evidence")


Justification
Junior high and high schools should start an hour later because students need the extra rest to concentrate in school. Experts agree that this rest is vital for optimal brain function. Dr. Snooze at the ZZZ Center for Sleep explains, “Exhaustion is a huge obstacle in the path toward academic success.” When students are tired, they simply can’t focus in class. A simple solution to this problem is starting school later, thus giving students an extra hour to sleep in the morning. (underline=evidence; bold= justification of the premise; italics= justification of the claim as presented in the introduction)
Student Directions: Read each claim and premise below. Then, choose one piece of provided evidence to best support the premise. Next to each option, explain why you would or would not include it as evidence in a paragraph for an argumentative essay. (Complete the handout "Justification")


Independent Work: (Different classes are working at different points in regards to the writing process.
Finish taking notes on whether or not cursive writing should be taught in schools.
Complete the half sheet on which you will identify your claim, two supporting premises, and your counterclaim.
Write your introduction—Hook, Summary, Claim.
If you have finished your introduction, begin working on the paragraph proving your claim. 
Remember to use your own words. 


In writing the body paragraphs–If you are using the words from the article, you need to put them in quotation marks. If you are using the ideas from the article, you need to reference the paragraph.

Due:

Feb. 3, 2020

Feb. 3, 2020 "Setting the Scene" for Evidence

Learning Target: Today, I am learning to “set the scene” in a body paragraph before writing any evidence.Success Criteria: To Be Successful, I can. . .
define evidence
identify the more effective introduction to evidence in a paragraph
“set the scene” for evidence in a body paragraph
Do Now: While the timer counts down, complete as much of the “Vocabulary Quiz” as you can--“Page 16”/back page of your vocabulary packet.


Connection/ Teaching Point:
Yesterday we connected claims with matching premises (supporting reasons for the claim).

Today we are going to look at how we incorporate evidence.

When writing body paragraphs, it’s important to “set the scene” before any quotes that you include. It’s great to have “The author states” to introduce a quote, but we’re going to take this idea a step further and include some background information about the origin of the evidence. We’re calling this “setting the scene.” 
“Setting the Scene” is the equivalent to providing a lead-in to your evidence.


Mini-Lesson (see presentation)
How would you introduce evidence in a paragraph?
according to…
experts agree…
research suggests…
These sentence starters work, but rather than write the evidence directly after these phrases, you should have an introductory sentence which “sets the scene” for your evidence.
Active Engagement:
It’s more effective to “set the scene” for the evidence before you actually present it.

Let’s look at 2 paragraphs and decide which one “sets the scene” more effectively. (see handout)
Example
Smoking is a potentially lethal habit, so outlawing cigarettes would save lives. ***** [here]*****According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, over 480,000 people die of smoking-related deaths in the U.S. each year. As long as cigarettes are available to the public, people will buy them. Without the drastic measure of outlawing cigarettes, more people will become victims.
(See handout)


Independent Work:
Reread the article–”Should We Continue to Use Cursive Writing?”
Take notes as you read.
Use the graphic organizer to write down the facts and details that you find that 1) support using cursive writing and 2) support not using cursive writing. 
When finish organizing your notes, complete the half sheet on which you will identify your claim, two supporting premises, and your counterclaim.
Then, you may begin writing your introduction (hook, summary, claim)

Due:

Feb. 2, Claims and Premises- Lesson 10 in Google Classroom

Feb. 2, Claims and Premises- Lesson 10

Learning Target: Today, I am learning what a premise is and matching premises to claims.


Success Criteria: 
explain what a premise is;
match premises to claims;
take written notes regarding the article (pros and cons);
complete the graphic organizer for claim, premise, counterclaim;
begin writing an introduction to the argumentative essay.
Do Now: If you do not have the vocabulary packet, you will not be able to do the Do Now. I do not have a PDF or Google Document version of this packet.
Those in class will complete the synonyms and antonyms for the vocabulary.
For those who have the packet, remember there will be a multiple-choice google form quiz on Friday.


Mini-Lesson
What is a premise?
The first sentence of a body paragraph in an argumentative essay.
It states a reason that supports your claim.
(Also known as the topic sentence)
Active Learning (timed)
You will have a set amount of time to work with your partner to complete the claim-premise handout.
After time concludes, you will need to finish any remaining work on your own.
If at home, you may need to print the document to match up the claims and premises. You may also complete the exercise on a piece of loose leaf notebook paper. I suggest that you could use letters to identify the claims (A, B, C. . .) and number the premises. Then record the correct letter for each premise. There are 8 claims and 10 premises.


Independent Work:
Reread the article–”Should We Continue to Use Cursive Writing?”
Take notes as you read.
Use the graphic organizer to write down the facts and details that you find that 1) support using cursive writing and 2) support not using cursive writing. 
If you finish organizing your notes, you may begin writing your introduction.

Due:

Jan. 31 Argument Lesson 8, Claims in Google Classroom

Jan. 31 Argument Lesson 8, Claims

Learning Target: Today, I am learning to determine the difference between an effective claim and an ineffective claim.
Success Criteria: To be Successful, I can…

explain why a claim is effective
explain why a claim is ineffective
sort claims - effective and ineffective
rewrite ineffective claims so they become effective
Do Now:
According to researchers at Binghamton University, ending a thought with a period in a text message may convey indifference or insincerity. In other words, people who receive such a message might interpret the ending punctuation to mean that the sender cares less about them or is less genuine. Celia Klin, an associate professor of psychology at Binghamton University, examined these curious text rules in a study.  
What does indifference mean?
A. Lack of respect for rules
B. Lack of concern or interest
C. Talent with words


Connection: Last week we discussed the first 2 parts of an introduction paragraph: hook and summary.
Today we will look at the 3d part: claims.

Teaching Point: Today, I want to teach you how to identify whether or not a claim is effective and how to rewrite ineffective claims.

Mini-Lesson:
What is a claim?
What makes a claim effective?
What would make a claim ineffective?
Active Engagement:
Take Notes--
What makes a claim effective?
it clearly states the author’s position on a topic
it does not include any reasons to support the claim
What makes an ineffective claim?
it does not state the author’s position on a topic
it includes reasons to support the claim  
Read the following claim and decide if it is effective or ineffective:
Junior high classes should start later in the morning because teenagers need a lot of sleep. #1

Reasoning: This claim is ineffective because while it does state a position about schools starting later, it also includes a reason, which should be left out of a claim.

What part of the argument is used to introduce the reason(s) behind the claim?

> See the presentation for a rewritten version of this claim for the claim is ineffective. 


Independent Work:
Using the graphic organizer and the claim strips, evaluate whether or not each claim is effective or ineffective.
If you are unable to use the Google Slide document, please print out the work sheet or complete the task on a sheet of notebook paper.
Place a check mark in the correct column (effective or ineffective)
Explain why the claim is either effective or ineffective.
Rewrite any claim that you believe is ineffective.





When finished, students will complete any missing work or work on IXL MAP Study Plan Skills

Due:

Jan. 28- Student Choice Achieve Article  in Google Classroom

Jan. 28- Student Choice Achieve Article

Select an Achieve article of your choice.
Copy the vocabulary that is associated with your article into your Writer's Notebook. 
Answer the "Response Questions."
Finally, answer the "Thought Question" that goes with your particular choice article.


Work on any make-up work that you have for the class.


Have a great weekend.

Due:

Jan. 27 Writing Summaries, Lesson 7 in Google Classroom

Jan. 27 Writing Summaries, Lesson 7

Learning Target: Today, I am learning to write a brief summary of topics for the introduction paragraph.

Success Criteria: To Be Successful, I can-

create summaries when given 3 bullet points for individual topics
Do Now:

We are all excited to tell students about this year’s fundraiser. Instead of asking you to sell magazines or candy, we are holding an online Read-a-Thon!
We can’t do this without you. To meet our fundraising goal of $5,000, we need all students to register online and create an account. Next invite sponsors via email or social media. Sponsors can pledge a dollar for every hour you read or they can pledge a fixed amount. Improve your reading ability and support your school at the same time. Get started today!
Which best shows that the author’s purpose is to encourage students to take part in the fundraiser?

The author tells the reader we can’t do this without you and asks them to get started today
The author contrasts the Read-a-Thon with previous fundraisers.
The author names a specific figure as a fundraising goal ($5,000).
Connection

Yesterday we worked on writing hooks that connected to a provided summary. 
Hook and the start of the summary regarding the topic “Music in Class” --Music is a soft blanket, protecting the listener from the discomforts of their environment. Indeed, many students report that they can attend to their work longer while listening to music. They also claim that music helps to drown out the distractions of the classroom. . .  

Today, we work on writing summaries for provided topics.


Teaching Point:
Today, I want to teach you how to write a summary from a short bulleted list of details. Remember that the introduction is made up of three sections: hook, summary, and claim.



Mini-Lesson: Please see the presentation for an example.


Independent Work: Complete and submit the attached worksheet (presented as a Google Presentation)
Choose three hooks and match them to their corresponding summary bullet points. Then, on the back page, write a summary 9no more than three sentences) based on the bullet points provided and combine it with the matching hook. Use the example to help you complete the task.

Due:

Jan. 26 Connecting Hooks and Summaries in Google Classroom

Jan. 26 Connecting Hooks and Summaries

Learning Target:
Today, I am learning to connect a hook to a summary 
Success Criteria:
I can…
write hooks for a given summaries
Do Now:
We are all excited to tell students about this year’s fundraiser. Instead of asking you to sell magazines or candy, we are holding an online Read-a-Thon!
We can’t do this without you. To meet our fundraising goal of $5,000, we need all students to register online and create an account. Next invite sponsors via email or social media. Sponsors can pledge a dollar for every hour you read or they can pledge a fixed amount. Improve your reading ability and support your school at the same time. Get started today!
Which author’s purpose is suggested by the text?
A. to inform students why the fundraiser is necessary.
B.to encourage students to take part in the fundraiser.
C. to teach students how to create an online account.
Connection:
Yesterday we identified the 3 parts of an introduction paragraph and created different types of hooks.
Today, we will write hooks for summaries (the middle section of the introduction, which comes after the hook and before the claim).
Remember the types of Hooks we reviewed:
interesting question
fact or statistic
metaphor/simile
description
quotation
Active Engagement:
Topic-Standardized Testing
Write an "Interesting Question Hook" to go with the following summary:
Most states implement them, and they serve a variety of purposes. For instance, they give students, parents, teachers, and administrators insight into what students have learned. Some states also use these tests as a benchmark that students must meet in order to graduate. The ideas is that they make students and schools accountable for learning. 


Complete the attached worksheet for which you will write different hooks for the provided summaries.


Independent Work:
Write a paragraph explaining which type of hook was the easiest to write and why you think it worked best with the provided summary.

Due:

Jan. 24 Argument Lesson 4- ¨The Bountiful Case¨ in Google Classroom

Jan. 24 Argument Lesson 4- ¨The Bountiful Case¨

Learning Target: Today, I am learning to analyze a passage to identify the claim, premise, & evidence. as well as writing a justification for their claim.Success Criteria:
I can…
read a passage
identify important details
make a claim and premise
find supporting evidence for the claim, premise, and counterclaim
write a justification
write a counterclaim
Connection:
Last week, we went over argument vocabulary and completed a case report finding a claim, premise, evidence and justification for our claim.
Today you’ll be completing another mystery on your own.  You will be doing the same thing with this mystery as last week.Do Now: Read the following passage and write the correct answer in your Writerś Notebook.
Slouching at the corner table in a forgotten diner in a quiet part of town, Tom Beasley looks as if he just rolled out of bed. Beasley, who is known as the  “difficult one”in the boy band Momentum, is wearing a pair of heavily ripped jeans and a white T-shirt. His black leather jacket looks as if it might have been run over by a bulldozer. A faded straw fedora is pulled low over his forehead casting a shadow across brown eyes fringed with ridiculously thick eyelashes. 
 
Which authorś purpose is suggested by the text?
A.to describe Tom Beasleyś appearance 
B. to convince readers that Tom Beasley is an important musician


Mini-Lesson/ Student Directions: Your detective agency has been hired to investigate what indeed happened to Walter Bountiful. 
Did he slip? Or perhaps he was pushed into the pool? Something else?
Use the graphic organizer to create your case report with potential theories (claims) and evidence from the crime scene synopsis (summary) and picture.



Individual Work:
Answer the last question on the graphic organizer.
Which piece of evidence do you think most strongly supports what happened to Mr. Walter Bountiful? Explain.
(Remember to use details from the story to support your response– quote).


Any time you have left in class, should be spent completing make-up work and/or working on your IXL Skill Plan.
Please refer to your argumentative vocabulary as needed.

Due:

Jan. 25- Hooks in Google Classroom

Jan. 25- Hooks

Learning Target
Today, I am learning to create hooks for an argumentative essay.

Success Criteria: To be Successful, I can…
define different types of hooks
create different types of hooks for a selected claim
Do Now: Reread the passage and answer the question. Record the correct answer in your Writer's Notebook. 
(1st and 4th Periods will finish the second portion of "The Bountiful Case" worksheet.)

Slouching at the corner table in a forgotten diner in a quiet part of town, Tom Beasley looks as if he just rolled out of bed. Beasley, who is known as the  “difficult one” in the boy band Momentum, is wearing a pair of heavily ripped jeans and a white T-shirt. His black leather jacket looks as if it might have been run over by a bulldozer. A faded straw fedora is pulled low over his forehead casting a shadow across brown eyes fringed with ridiculously thick eyelashes. 
Which shows the author’s purpose to describe Tom Beasley’s appearance?

The author provides specific details like slouching at the corner table and heavily ripped jeans. 
The author informs readers that Tom is the “difficult one” in the band. 
Mini Lesson: Review of Hooks (Please see the presentation for the definition and examples)
There is a handout that you can glue into your notebook (see attached).


interesting question
fact or statistic
metaphor/simile
description
quotation
Hook: A hook is an opening statement (which is usually the first sentence) in an essay that attempts to grab the reader's attention so that they want to read on.

Today, you will be working on a Hook Activity.
You may  work in pairs or in groups of 3. You may also select to work alone. 
You will choose one of the given claims and create each type of hook for the claim. Partners will work together to create claims for their chosen claim.

Active Engagement: (for those present in class; otherwise, please complete the assignment on your own. 

Independent Work:
Write a paragraph explaining which type of hook worked best for your chosen claim and why you think it worked best.

Due:

Jan. 19, Argument Lesson 2 in Google Classroom

Jan. 19, Argument Lesson 2

Read all of the Instructions (to the end). Learning Target: Today, I am learning to analyze a passage to identify the claim, premise, & evidence, as well as writing a justification for my claim.

Success Criteria
To be Successful, I can…
read a passage
identify important details
make a claim and premise
find evidence for the claim and premise
write a justification
Do Now: copy the correct answer down into your Writer's Notebook
I’d been fantasizing about this moment. . .for many months. But now that I was finally here, actually standing on the summit of Mount Everest, I just couldn’t summon the energy to care.
It was early in the afternoon of May 10, 1996. I hadn’t slept in fifty-seven hours. The only food I’d been able to force down over the preceding three days was a bowl of ramen soup and a handful of peanut M&Ms. Weeks of violent coughing had left me with two separated ribs that made ordinary breathing an excruciating trial. At 29,028 feet up in the troposphere, so little oxygen was reaching my brain that my mental capacity was that of a slow child. Under the circumstances, I was incapable of feeling much of anything except cold and tired. 
Which best shows the author’s purpose is to describe how it felt to reach Mount Everest ?A. the author uses concrete details like handful of peanut M&Ms and two separated ribs to depict his experience.
B. the author provides facts like the date (May 10, 1996) and the elevation (29, 028 feet) 
Connection:
Yesterday we discussed the vocabulary that we are going to use throughout our argumentative unit. 
Today you’ll get a copy of the vocabulary with specific examples. Then we will practice identifying these parts of an argument by reading a mystery synopsis (summary).
Teaching Point:
Today, I want to teach you that writing an argument paper is much like solving a mystery. You have a claim, premise, potential counterclaims, evidence, and justification.   



"Arson on Arlington Street"
Reading Strategy: Read the question first. 
Student Directions: Your detective agency has been hired to investigate what has happened in the mystery story you’ve just read.
In the boxes below, fill out your case report with potential theories (claims) and evidence from the crime scene synopsis (summary) and picture.


Mini-Lesson

Read “Arson on Arlington Drive.”
This is a mystery/detective story.
Remember are practice annotating the text.
Remember to look at the picture. 
I suggest putting a * next to information you believe will be important. 
After you finish the story, complete the graphic organizer (attached) that requires you to identify a claim, premise, and evidence, as well as write a justification.
Complete the first page of the graphic organizer and the one section on the second page (see below).
Link:

Today you have broken down the parts of the story in the same way that you will break down any argument that you write. You have identified a claim, premise, evidence; provided justification.


Independent Work: (second page of the Graphic Organizer)
Go to the back page of the document, and answer the question in the last box:
Which piece of evidence do you think most strongly supports what happened? Explain.
(Remember to use details from the story to support your response).

Due:

Jan. 20- Argument Lesson 2 (Day 2) in Google Classroom

Jan. 20- Argument Lesson 2 (Day 2)

Read the attached detective report about fires that happened on Arlington Drive.  
You will look at the evidence and determine your claim: 
Were the fires 
started by a neighborhood arsonist, or 
were the fires just a string of unfortunate coincidences?
Fill in the boxes on the attached worksheet  with your claim, premise, evidence, justification, counterclaim, evidence and justification.
PLEASE USE THE ENGLISH VERSION OF THE GRAPHIC ORGANIZER THAT IS ATTACHED TO JAN. 19TH.

Due:

Jan. 20 Achieve

Jan. 20 Achieve "The Case of Having Pets"

Learning Target/ Teaching Point:  I can read and comprehend literary nonfiction. I can determine the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words.

Success Criteria:
To Be Successful, I can. . .
define vocabulary words;
identify how the vocabulary relates to article;
answer questions and comprehend nonfiction article;
identify the author’s purpose;
Support the author’s claim with textual evidence.


Do Now: In your Writer's Notebook, copy the vocabulary that is associated with your version of the article.

Read the Achieve 3000 article titled, "The Case of Having Pets."
Answer the questions and complete the thought question.  The worksheet for Achieve is below.



Independent Work:
Today, students will use the Chromebooks to complete the assigned Achieve article. Students have two attempts to complete the article. The “thought question” is also part of the assignment (which are only included with the 5 step-lesson articles). 

When finished, students will work on their Recommended Skills in IXL.

Due:

Informational Essay #2- Student Choice in Google Classroom

Informational Essay #2- Student Choice

Please use the following Google Doc when composing your essay.

Due:

Informational Essay: Vultures in Google Classroom

Informational Essay: Vultures

Please compose your essay on the provided Google Doc.


Remember to refer to the checklist and grading rubric (provided in class) when writing your essay.


Informational Writing Checklist:
Heading
Topic sentence (for each paragraph)
Fact from notes
Cited evidence (where did you get the facts)
Explanation of evidence in your own words
Transitional word or phrase
Link to the next paragraph

Due:

October 15, 2021 -ing phrases (Day 3) in Google Classroom

October 15, 2021 -ing phrases (Day 3)

There will be a short quiz on Tuesday (10/19).
 Learning Target/ Teaching Point:I am learning to use -ing verbs to begin phrases that add ongoing action.

Success Criteria:
I can:
Notice -ing phrases in texts
Compare/contrast sentences with -ing phrases
Write sentences with -ing phrases
Notice meaning changes of a sentence when the -ing phrase is altered.
Revise my writing by adding -ing phrases
Do Now:
On your own, add an -ing phrase to the following sentences.

1. The kids walk to the store.

2. The teacher passes out the test.

3. Grandma decorates the cake.

4. The basketball player runs down the court.



Brent ambles across Justin’s lawn in a muscle T, annihilating patches of innocent grass with his gigantic flip-flops.

What are we looking for in the sentence?




See the slide presentation for how to complete the chart (page 1). If you are absent, do the best you can to complete page 2 of the chart.

Due:

October 5, 2021 Sentence Types Quiz  in Google Classroom

October 5, 2021 Sentence Types Quiz

Learning Target/ Teaching Point:
I am learning to identify different types of sentence structures.


Success Criteria:
I can:
Recognize simple, compound, complex sentences, compound complex and compound complex sentence
Connection: Now that we have reviewed the four sentence types and how to punctuate  compound, complex, and compound complex sentences, it is time for you to demonstrate your understanding of this grammatical construction.

Mini-Lesson:
Today is quiz day!

Active Engagement:
Students will take the quiz in Google Classroom.

Independent Practice:
If time allows, students will write a response to a journal prompt in their notebooks.
What would you do if you could travel into the future?

Due:

October 1, 2021 Grammar Quiz and Realistic Fiction Revision in Google Classroom

October 1, 2021 Grammar Quiz and Realistic Fiction Revision

Learning Target 
I am showing what I know on  a quiz on capitalization, transition words, dialogue punctuation, apostrophes, and fact/opinion.


To Be Successful, I can:
Focus and do my best on the quiz.
Students are to access the quiz through Google Classroom.


After finishing the quiz, students are to continue to revise their Realistic Fiction Stories.
Students who finish both assignments will work on the IXL ELA Diagnostic.

Due:

Your Story--Realistic Fiction in Google Classroom

Your Story--Realistic Fiction

You need to create an original realistic story that includes believable characters (based in the present or in the past), weaves an appropriate setting throughout the story, includes dialogue, features internal and/or external conflicts, and comes to a conclusive close/finish (resolution).


This is where you can type out your story as you work on it at home.  It will be saved to your drive. You can message me to read what you have so far, and I will comment on your story. We can also discuss your paper when we meet online during the school day.
Please do not submit it. The final story will not be due until we return from Distance Learning.
Email me with any questions as you continue to write at home.

[email protected]

Due:

September 10, 2021 According to the handout, what are two other ways to say

September 10, 2021 According to the handout, what are two other ways to say "said" when writing?

Due:

September 9, 2021 Unit 1, Lesson 9 in Google Classroom

September 9, 2021 Unit 1, Lesson 9

9/9/21 Unit 1 Session 9
Learning Target/ Teaching Point: 
Today, I am learning that writers “stay in scene” by making sure the scenes are founded in dialogue, action, and setting. 
Success Criteria:
To be successful, I can…
“Turn the on lights”  in my story

Show characters’ actions
Show place and time
Keep readers oriented to the story
Add action, thoughts, feelings, and setting by creating meaningful dialogue tags
 Today, we will discuss the importance of grounding your dialogue.
Mini Lesson
Dialogue

Writers then revise their scenes by adding action, thoughts, feelings, and setting details.

Characters not only need to talk, they also need to think, feel, and move within the setting.

Here’s an example from a former student.

First he wrote this:

I was so embarrassed,  I didn’t know what to say. “Um…”
“Just apologize,” she said.
“I’m sorry,” I said.
“You’re forgiven. Let’s go get a slice.”

Then the student added action, thoughts, feelings, and setting to this scene.

I was so embarrassed.  I didn’t know what to say. “Um…” I kicked a pile of leaves that had gathered at the base of one of the trees on Bergen Street. My face felt like it was so hot it would melt.

A breeze wooshed and leaves danced on the sidewalk. “Just apologize,” she said. She pulled her collar 

tighter and buttoned the top button.  I snuck a glance at her face. She was biting her bottom lip. I knew it was hard to ask for an apology.

An acorn fell off a tree and ricocheted off a car parked on the corner.  The smell of tomato sauce and garlic wafted in the cool late October air.  My stomach growled. I snuck another peek at her and now she was stomping every leaf on the sidewalk. Moving intentionally to them and then crushing them under her boots as she walked.  My heart pounded, What if I apologized and she didn’t forgive me? What if I didn’t and she never spoke to me again? “I’m sorry,” I said.

She turned her head and smiled. “You’re forgiven. Let’s go get a slice,” she said. She pointed to the pizza shop, two doors down. I raced ahead, stomach still growling, so I could hold the door.

How did this add to the scene?

Independent: Students will continue to draft, with the focus on revising their scenes to show thoughts, actions, feelings, and setting.

Due:

September 9, 2021 What do you call the punctuation marks you need to use around dialogue? in Google Classroom

September 9, 2021 What do you call the punctuation marks you need to use around dialogue?

Due:

September 8, 2021 Which type of LEAD will you use for your paper? (Please refer to the presentation and handout resources.) in Google Classroom

September 8, 2021 Which type of LEAD will you use for your paper? (Please refer to the presentation and handout resources.)

Due:

September 7, 2021 What is one of the ways to add to the characterization of your character? (slides 7-8) in Google Classroom

September 7, 2021 What is one of the ways to add to the characterization of your character? (slides 7-8)

Due:

September 2, 2021--Name the three types of external conflict. in Google Classroom

September 2, 2021--Name the three types of external conflict.

Please answer this question for your answer assists in keeping proper attendance records.

Due:

September 1, 2021  From 2-D to 3-D: Planning and Writing Scenes by Including Evidence  in Google Classroom

September 1, 2021 From 2-D to 3-D: Planning and Writing Scenes by Including Evidence

9/1/21

Learning Target: I am learning that fictional writers make their stories come to life by providing evidence in the story’s events, showing not telling, and story-tell, bit by bit.


Success Criteria:  I can:
Differentiate between a summary and a story
Include evidence in your story
Show characters in action
Add tension by developing action


Writers need to make their story ideas come to life by adding details, emotions, and step-by-step action.

The idea for your story is like a summary.  
It TELLS what the story is about.
We call that a 2D story.   

The story itself needs to come to life!! It needs evidence of the events that happen! It needs to SHOW details, emotion, and needs to come to life.
We call this a 3D story.

Let’s look at the difference:

Example of a 2D story idea:
On Friday afternoon, Mr. Smith’s snake escaped the science lab.

Example of a 3D story:
The breeze rattled the shades as it blew into our classroom window.  There was soft music playing in the background.  The classroom was still except for the occasional turning of a page.  Everyone was engrossed in reading.  Suddenly, the door to the classroom swung open with a slam.  Mr. Smith stood in the doorway. His glasses slightly crooked, his forehead beaded with sweat, “The snake escaped!”

Can you see the difference? 
The 2D version is a summary.  It TELLS a lot of information quickly, in not that many words.
The 3D version is storytelling!  It SHOWS what is happening bit by bit in a scene.

Now it’s your turn to try this.
On the attached document, write a 2D summary of one scene of your story.
Then, write a 3D version of that same scene - make the scene come to life with details, emotion, and step-by-step action.

When finished, continue to work on your story

Due:

September 1, 2021 --What is the name of the main character in your story? in Google Classroom

September 1, 2021 --What is the name of the main character in your story?

Please complete the following question for part of today's assignment.

Due:

August 31, 2021--What are the five parts of a traditional plot line/ story arc? in Google Classroom

August 31, 2021--What are the five parts of a traditional plot line/ story arc?

Due:

August 27, 2021 Internal/External Conflict, Struggles & Motivation in Google Classroom

August 27, 2021 Internal/External Conflict, Struggles & Motivation

8/27/21 Internal/External Conflicts-Struggles & Motivation


Learning Target: I am learning that writers develop characters who face internal and/or external struggles, so that I can create conflicts for my characters.

Success Criteria:  I can
Define internal and external conflict
Complete a T-Chart for my character that includes internal and/or external conflicts
Determine what my character wants in my story
Determine what stands in the way of my character being successful


Let’s look closely at 2 of the characters from The Outsiders:  Ponyboy and Johnny.
What do they want in the story? What motivates them? (character motivations)
What do they struggle with? 
Ponyboy: 
Motivation - he wants to win the affection and love of his brother, Darry.
Struggle: He feels he is a constant let down to his brother.
Johnny:
Motivation - his guilt for killing Bob.
Struggle: he feels he should die or suffer consequences for that.

When writing a story, you need to develop your character as if he/she is a real person with desires (things they want) and struggles (obstacles that get in their way)

Think about the story you are writing and the main character you are creating.
What is your story about?
Who is your main character?
What does your character want (or not want) 
        This is your character’s motivation.
Is anything preventing your character from getting what he wants or doesn’t want?
      This is your character’s obstacle or struggle

Characters can also have internal and external conflicts.
External - Some object or recognition the character wants (skateboard trophy)
Internal - Something that the character feels inside of himself (pleasing his dad; no confidence in himself))

Types of Conflict
External
generally takes place between a person and someone or something else, such as nature, another person or persons, or an event or situation. External conflicts may be character vs. character, character vs. nature, or character vs. society.


Internal
Takes place in a person’s mind—for example, a struggle to make a decision or overcome a feeling. Internal conflicts are character vs. self.



Individual Work:
You will complete the T-Chart for your main character to show what his/her internal and/or external conflicts he/she has.

You will also complete the Internal/External conflict worksheet.

Then, you will work on your own scene, jumping right into the action of the scene. Add details of the setting and try to show how the character feels and the conflicts he/she has.

Due:

August 26, 2021 Show Don't Tell Assignment in Google Classroom

August 26, 2021 Show Don't Tell Assignment

Today I will learn that writers develop characters by showing and not telling, so that I will be able to create realistic characters.


Please review and follow the presentation. You will complete the "Show Don't Tell" handout as today's assignment.


Remember what we discussed yesterday about scenes (this Anchor Chart should be copied into your Writer's Notebook):
                     Scenes
=Are small moments or mini-stories


=Include a clear setting that is
woven throughout the moment


=Have characters who are thinking,
talking, acting, or perhaps doing all of those things
=Contain
a character motivation and obstacle of some sort


Remember what we discussed about developing character
•Show
the setting


•Describe
what the character is thinking at that moment


•Have
someone say something


•Show
characters actions


•Have
the character make a decision
•Generate Traits


•Reveal wants and challenges


•Consider character’s attitudes
toward self.


•Explore character’s relationships
with others.


•Describe character’s movements,
facial expressions, tics, styles, quirks, etc.






Showing vs. Telling

TELLING: 
Mikell was terribly afraid of the dark.


SHOWING: 
As his mother switched off the light and left the room, Mikell tensed. He huddled under the covers, gripped the sheets, and held his breath as the wind brushed past the curtain.


(Charlotte’s Web text) Turn and Talk: How does the passage show rather than tell?

Here are 4 “Show, Don’t Tell” Tips (copy the 4 tips in notebooks)
Tip #1. Create a sense of setting
Tip #2. Use dialogue to show character
Tip #3. If in doubt, always describe action
Tip #4. Use strong details, but don’t overdo it
Example:
Enzo was late.  >>>>>>>>>> 
He was late. St Mark’s clocktower had struck one and Enzo found himself pushing against the tide of tourists wandering towards the cafes lining the Piazza San Marco. A clump of pigeons scattered in front of him. He muttered to himself, “I won’t make it in time.”    



Now, it is your turn. 
Complete the Show, don’t Tell worksheet.
Then, continue to work on developing the setting and characters of your story.

Due:

August 24, 2021 What Stories Do I Believe Should Exist? in Google Classroom

August 24, 2021 What Stories Do I Believe Should Exist?

Review the presentation and then complete the following Google Document.

Due:

August 23, 2021 Strategies for Generating Personal Narrative Topics in Google Classroom

August 23, 2021 Strategies for Generating Personal Narrative Topics

Please review the presentation (in announcements), and then, complete the attached document.